Current ProjectConnections Newsletter

Every other week, the ProjectConnections newsletter keeps you up-to-date with our latest project management articles, blog postings, and site resources. Newsletter subscribers also get the inside track on special Premium templates available for download to those with a free Member account!

Want to get our Newsletter? Sign up today! Membership is free, only takes a minute, and gets you access to a broad selection of Templates, Guidelines, Papers, Presentations, Interviews and Case Studies as well.

Already a member? Click here to update your opt-in preferences.

Visit our Newsletter Archive to read past issues.

Current Newsletter (View as new window)


4 Ways to Understand "Customers", 5 Risk Mistakes, & Fearless Leadership
ProjectConnections  Newsletter
Would you rather read our newsletter online? Click here to get there.
Facebook Twitter
August 25, 2016 In this edition:
This week is focused on quick, practical tips in two areas of major importance to ANY project - how well you understand the people you're doing a project for (and impacting in some way); and how well we handle the risks inherent in pretty much any project. Our contributors share their favorite techniques and painful, but valuable learnings. And finally, I added in a favorite classic article on "fearless project leadership" - what matters in the midst of scary, innovative, near-impossible projects... (which has personal relevance for me right now!)
Cinda
» Featured Article
» Spotlight
» Corporate Subscriptions




Featured Articles
Techniques for Stakeholder and User Analysis
by Kent McDonald

Kent McDonald I have heard it said, and have probably said it many times myself, that IT projects would be so much easier if people weren't involved. That's not the case -- people are involved, and they are the most important aspect of the projects.

The main purpose of IT projects in particular is to change the work people do or the way in which they do it, so it makes sense to figure out how best to work with the people you are going to impact. I'd like to share some techniques to help do so, focusing on project sponsors, subject matter experts, users, regulators, and service providers.

See Kent's favorite techniques, including stakeholder maps, commitment scales, user analysis, and user modeling

Related links:
[TEMPLATE]  User Impact Assessment
[BLOG]  5 Lessons on Customer Value
[TEMPLATE]  Change Management Planning Worksheet

Spotlight – Other Project Templates, Tools, and Techniques
Rain, Flight Delays, and Risk Management - Common Risk Management Mistakes
Knowing how to theoretically manage risks is no good if we forget to put it into practice - which can easily happen in the heat of just getting things done. Alan Zucker shares 5 typical causes of "missing in action" risk management from a recent personal situation, and a simple and practical step to avoid each one.

Related links:
[BLOG]  Great teams don't hope!
[ARTICLE]  Risk management takes a village
[TEMPLATE]  Late Cost Per Week Worksheet (helps justify schedule risk mitigations)


Fearless Project Leadership
This classic article Kimberly Wiefling maintains "In order to deliver results in the challenging circumstances typical of many business environments, project leaders must be absolutely committed to the success of their projects and leading their team to that success. Frequently they must execute this feat without any explicit support, sometimes with active resistance, and occasionally in the absence of any evidence that the project is indeed possible." Read her great tips for being fearless, and maximally effective, even in the scariest of innovative, uncertain situations.

Related links:
[BLOG]  Sustaining your hope as a project manager
[ARTICLE]  Readiness - A Framework for Leadership
[ARTICLE]  Principles of Project Leadership


Stakeholder Analysis Summary Table – SPECIAL
This Premium resource is free to registered Members until September 8, 2016
A stakeholder is any group or individual who is related to the project, either because they impact it or because they are impacted by it. They represent all parts of the project, from kick-off to delivery and end use. In some cases, a project's stakeholders may have competing interests or limited resources. This means that the project team members must balance the various stakeholders' needs.

The stakeholder analysis document can be used to facilitate the decision-making process. This information also helps verify that all project stakeholders are receiving the appropriate attention needed to ensure that the project moves forward smoothly. Get the Template »

Corporate Subscriptions and Licensing
Want your team members to have their own access to templates and how-to resources for their project work? Need to share documents and deliverables beyond your project team? We make it easier with affordable corporate subscriptions and licensing. Detailed information regarding corporate options is available online. Give your whole team, or even the entire organization, cost-effective access to our comprehensive online library of resources. You already know how helpful it's been for you. Now it's time to share with everyone else. Find out more »

Not sure if corporate terms apply to you? Check out our licensing terms at the top of our Terms of Service page, in refreshingly ordinary, everyday English.


Home     Change Email Preferences     Lost Password     Help     


If you no longer wish to receive newsletters and special announcements from ProjectConnections, please update your preferences. You are subscribed to this list as [email].

For other communication please contact us at customerservice@projectconnections.com or call 888-722-5235.

ProjectConnections.com
493 Seaport Ct., Suite 102
Redwood City, CA 94063

Copyright © 2015 Emprend, Inc. All Rights Reserved.




©Copyright 2000-2016 Emprend, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
About us   Site Map   View current sponsorship opportunities (PDF)
Contact us for more information or e-mail info@projectconnections.com
Terms of Service and Privacy Policy