Knowing is a Human Act: How Information Technology Inspired, But Cannot Deliver Knowledge Management

The paper requires a free Member account
Please log in to download the file. Don't have a log in? Register now, it's fast and free!
Log in to download this file

Username:  
Password:  



Abstract
Building an information repository isn't enough. "Knowing is a human act," and requires involvement, not just information. This paper by Richard McDermott explains why this matters to those developing knowledge management strategies, and proposes some key implications for leveraging the knowledge hidden in your organization.


What this is

This paper discusses the critical human component of any knowledge management system, and explains why designing an IT solution -- even a brilliant IT solution -- is only half of the task.


Why it's useful

Recent developments in information technology have inspired many companies to imagine a new way for staff to share knowledge and insights. Instead of storing documents in personal files and sharing insights with a small circle of colleagues, they can store documents in a common information base and use electronic networks to share insights with their whole community. But most companies soon discover that leveraging knowledge is actually very hard and involves more community building than information technology. This is not because people are reluctant to use information technology. It is because they often need to share knowledge that is neither obvious nor easy to document, knowledge that requires a human relationship to think about, understand, and share. Ironically, while information technology has inspired the "knowledge revolution," it takes building human communities to realize it.



The paper requires a free Member account
Please log in to download the file. Don't have a log in? Register now, it's fast and free!
Log in to download this file

Username:  
Password:  





Related Templates
Knowing in Community
As knowledge management evolves from fad to business imperative, many organizations are discovering the limited ability of information technology to capture and share ideas, insights, and know-how. Richard McDermott presents communities of practice as a better vehicle for knowledge sharing and discusses ten critical success factors in building vibrant, effective communities.

Learning Across Teams
Many companies today are moving to a new organizational model in which cross-functional teams are the key building block of the organization. While cross-functional teams are great vehicles for producing products and services, they have some key limitations that communities of practice can help address.




©Copyright 2000-2017 Emprend, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
About us   Site Map   View current sponsorship opportunities (PDF)
Contact us for more information or e-mail info@projectconnections.com
Terms of Service and Privacy Policy

Get Our Newsletter
Get our latest content delivered to your inbox, every other week. New case studies, articles, templates, online courses, and more. Check out our Newsletter Archive for past issues.

Follow Us!
Linked In Facebook Twitter RSS Feeds

Got a Question?
Drop us an email or call us toll free:
888-722-5235
Learn more about ProjectConnections, our contributors, and our membership levels and product options.