Meeting System IQ Test


Quick Summary
No one ever passes "Bernard DeKoven's Meeting System IQ Test." Not yet. Use this PDF file together in a meeting and collectively score your Meeting System. Even if you learn nothing else, you'll discover that you do in fact have a Meeting System. And not just one! Contributed by Bernard DeKoven, Principal at the CoWorking Institute.


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What this is

An evaluation questionnaire for assessing the effectiveness of your current approach to meetings -- your "meeting system." It includes items that matter before, during and after your meetings; writing agendas, taking action items, reaching consensus and making complex decisions, meeting participation and productivity, and overall value of the meetings to your organization.


Why it's useful

"Smart" meeting systems support productive communication before, during, and after meetings. This simple scoring tool helps show where an organization is overall in its meeting effectiveness, and what areas are the most problematic. Use it to get a quick assessment of how pervasively flawed (or not!) your meetings are, and select target areas for improvement.


How to use it

  1. Evaluate your meeting system according to the 23 measures of productive communication included in the test. A project manager can do it for his project team-related meetings as a quick sanity check. If you'd like to get some team buy-in to fixing your meetings, have the team members fill it out individually and compile the scores, or come up with scores as a group. Likewise, if a functional manager or executive is aiming to improve meetings in a department, the manager can individually fill out the assessment to get a quick read, or engage key staff in an assessment.
  2. For each measure, determine how your meeting system scores on the scale from NOT-SO-SMART (0) to SMART (10). A score of 230 is possible, a score greater than 100 is above average.
  3. Look at areas that scored particularly low -- 6 or below -- and discuss which ones are most critical to improve in your situation. Remember, you don't have to try to fix every issue with every meeting immediately. Find a few key leverage points that you know will improve a current effort and concentrate on those.
  4. With your team or staff, devise an action plan for improving on those areas. Read the "not so smart" and "smart" descriptors on the evaluation test, and come up with assigned actions for achieving meeting smarts.
  5. Hold a check-in review no later than a month after implementing the changes. Have meetings improved, at least within the initial areas you targeted?
  6. Use the evaluation sheet periodically to assess progress in these areas. Also return to your original assessment and plan actions in the next set of important meeting factors.

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